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Safe Sleep 101

Updated: Apr 8

Reviewing these checklists will help prepare you for your newborn, help you to eliminate potential risks, and help promote solid sleep foundations safely.


Baby sleep is wonderful, it’s something all parents strive for. Here at The Slumber Nest, I develop sleep plans that are customized and suited for you and your child individually. Prior to implementing a sleep plan for you and your family, it is my number one priority to ensure that your child’s sleep environment is safe, and free from any potential risks or hazards. I have developed a crib safety checklist for infants, and a room safety checklist for toddlers. Reviewing these checklists will help prepare you for your newborn, help you to eliminate potential risks, and help promote solid sleep foundations safely.


INFANT
  • Always ensure your baby is sleeping on a firm surface, such as a safety approved mattress, with a tight fitting sheet covering the mattress.

  • Your infant should always be placed on their back for sleep. If your baby starts rolling over independently, it is ok to let them be.

  • Keep the crib free from loose objects, such as blankets, toys, or bumpers.

  • Wean from swaddling as soon as your baby shows any signs of rolling.

  • Place the crib at least an arms length away from any tabletops, picture frames, lamps, or monitors.

  • Crib slats should be no more than 2-⅜” apart.

  • Adjust crib to the lowest setting.

  • Room share with your baby up until 6 months of age, but do not share a bed.

  • If your baby is in a bassinet or play yard, only use the mattress that comes with the product.

  • Make sure to keep an eye on weight restrictions of your bassinet, and make the transition when your baby outgrows it.

TODDLER

  • If your toddler has transitioned to a “big kid bed” treat the entire room like a crib. Remove climbable furniture, and purchase a baby proofing kit for the room (found on amazon)

Make sure cords are out of reach or hidden.
  • Open sides of the bed (sides without rails or head/footboards) should be at least 1 foot away from any walls or furniture. Just in case your child were to fall off the bed, this will prevent them from getting stuck.

  • Make sure all heavy furniture is anchored securely to the wall.

  • Pillows should not be introduced until your child is 2 or older. They just don’t need them yet, and can still pose suffocation risks. When introducing a pillow make sure it is thin and firm.

  • Use wearable blankets (sleep sacks) for as long as possible.

  • Top bunks of a bunk bed should not be used by a child younger than 6 years of age.


Sleep deprivation can make us do things we never thought we would do. You will literally do whatever it takes to get that baby to sleep. I have been there, and I am here to help. Sleep coaching will provide structure and healthy habits for your whole family.





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